Don’t Let the Coronavirus and Shelter in Place Directive Derail Your Job Search

//Don’t Let the Coronavirus and Shelter in Place Directive Derail Your Job Search

Don’t Let the Coronavirus and Shelter in Place Directive Derail Your Job Search

Since the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is spreading around the US, forcing many of us to shelter in place and creating economic uncertainty, you may be concerned that hiring will slow down amid talk of layoffs and hiring freezes. However, it’s important to remember that not every industry and not every company slows down in an economic dip. The bottom line, according to recruiter and job search consultant Lisa Rangel (How Will Coronavirus Affect Your Job Search in 2020?), is that people get hired during layoffs and hiring moves forward even when things slow down.

Here are a few strategies you can use to keep up your job hunt over the next few months:

Keep applying! During this uncertain economic moment, companies are re-evaluating their hiring processes and the roles they need to hire for. Many are also becoming more open-minded to hiring remote roles and questioning if there is a real need for certain types of positions to work in-person. Though the hiring processes of some companies may be slow, don’t stop applying and miss a chance to be considered for these roles.

If you haven’t started, don’t wait. Trying to determine the best time to get hired is futile. If you haven’t already, just start your search. Don’t stop even in times when you think no one is hiring. People get hired during slowdowns, and they’ll get hired during this coronavirus event as well. Starting your job search now could give you a competitive edge over those who stop searching.

Research and target companies and people. Use LinkedIn to research industries and companies you are interested in or that have open positions. Look for people you might know inside companies or managers who may be hiring and try to contact them by email to request informational interviews. Also, search for job openings on Indeed, Glassdoor and other job search sites. (see Find and Make Connections Inside Your Target Companies on the Career Center blog)

Anticipate delays. Not all companies have established a clear game plan for managing processes in light of COVID-19, so don’t be surprised or concerned if you’re not hearing back quickly. A company’s capacity to onboard new employees may be disrupted during the current crisis, and it may take a little time for them to get their hiring process back on track. Try to remain optimistic and continue adding to your pipeline of potential companies and jobs.

 Be patient and follow-up. if you haven’t heard back from the recruiter or hiring manager, it’s a good idea to follow up to ask for the next steps in the interview process. Be politely persistent. Leave voicemails and send emails to ask for updates. It shows that you’re interested in the job and may result in giving you a clearer picture of where you stand regarding a job opening. (see How to Follow Up After Submitting an Application on the Career Center blog)

Consider incorporating remote job boards or roles into your strategy. Remote work is becoming an option for professionals in a variety of industries. There are many companies already set up to support remote employees, including FlexJobs, We Work Remotely, Remote.co and Jobspresso.

Be prepared for virtual interviewing. Some companies have already called off in-person interviewing and are resorting exclusively to phone and video interviews to continue their hiring process. Interview coach Sarah Johnston shares some suggestions for job seekers who will be doing more video interviews due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic:

  • Do your research on the companies for which you are interviewing
  • Prepare a quiet, neutral space with good lighting
  • Have your notes in front of you
  • Practice talking to the camera by focusing on an object in front of you
  • Respond to the interviewer in the same way you would if it were an in-person interview

Learn a new skill or earn a certificate useful in your career. What skill could you use in your career to help you land your next job? Is there a new technology or idea in your field that you would like to learn more about? There are many resources for online learning, whether through actual coursework, e-books, online forums, YouTube videos and more. Identify a topic you can really dig into over the next few weeks, then set a daily schedule of learning for yourself.

Take care of projects around the house. Take advantage of the time that sheltering in place is providing to take care of projects or tasks around the house, such as cleaning out closets or reorganizing your garage and storage spaces. (See 15 Useful Things to Do When You’re Stuck at Home for more ideas)

Take care of yourself! It can be hard to remember to take time for yourself during a job search, especially when you don’t have the option of leaving the house. Be sure to schedule time for exercise (using videos or online exercise classes), cooking, meditating, reading or anything else that helps you feel relaxed, says careers specialist Nilza Marie Santana-Castillo (How to Navigate Your Job Search During the Coronavirus Pandemic). Step outside for a breath of fresh air, especially when you ne

Since the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is spreading around the US, forcing many of us to shelter in place and creating economic uncertainty, you may be concerned that hiring will slow down amid talk of layoffs and hiring freezes. However, it’s important to remember that not every industry and not every company slows down in an economic dip. The bottom line, according to recruiter and job search consultant Lisa Rangel (How Will Coronavirus Affect Your Job Search in 2020?), is that people get hired during layoffs and hiring moves forward even when things slow down.

Here are a few strategies you can use to keep up your job hunt over the next few months:

Keep applying! During this uncertain economic moment, companies are re-evaluating their hiring processes and the roles they need to hire for. Many are also becoming more open-minded to hiring remote roles and questioning if there is a real need for certain types of positions to work in-person. Though the hiring processes of some companies may be slow, don’t stop applying and miss a chance to be considered for these roles.

If you haven’t started, don’t wait. Trying to determine the best time to get hired is futile. If you haven’t already, just start your search. Don’t stop even in times when you think no one is hiring. People get hired during slowdowns, and they’ll get hired during this coronavirus event as well. Starting your job search now could give you a competitive edge over those who stop searching.

Research and target companies and people. Use LinkedIn to research industries and companies you are interested in or that have open positions. Look for people you might know inside companies or managers who may be hiring and try to contact them by email to request informational interviews. Also, search for job openings on Indeed, Glassdoor and other job search sites. (see Find and Make Connections Inside Your Target Companies on the Career Center blog)

Anticipate delays. Not all companies have established a clear game plan for managing processes in light of COVID-19, so don’t be surprised or concerned if you’re not hearing back quickly. A company’s capacity to onboard new employees may be disrupted during the current crisis, and it may take a little time for them to get their hiring process back on track. Try to remain optimistic and continue adding to your pipeline of potential companies and jobs.

Be patient and follow-up. if you haven’t heard back from the recruiter or hiring manager, it’s a good idea to follow up to ask for the next steps in the interview process. Be politely persistent. Leave voicemails and send emails to ask for updates. It shows that you’re interested in the job and may result in giving you a clearer picture of where you stand regarding a job opening. (see How to Follow Up After Submitting an Application on the Career Center blog)

Consider incorporating remote job boards or roles into your strategy. Remote work is becoming an option for professionals in a variety of industries. There are many companies already set up to support remote employees, including FlexJobs, We Work Remotely, Remote.co and Jobspresso.

Be prepared for virtual interviewing. Some companies have already called off in-person interviewing and are resorting exclusively to phone and video interviews to continue their hiring process. Interview coach Sarah Johnston shares some suggestions for job seekers who will be doing more video interviews due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic:

  • Do your research on the companies for which you are interviewing
  • Prepare a quiet, neutral space with good lighting
  • Have your notes in front of you
  • Practice talking to the camera by focusing on an object in front of you
  • Respond to the interviewer in the same way you would if it were an in-person interview

Learn a new skill or earn a certificate useful in your career. What skill could you use in your career to help you land your next job? Is there a new technology or idea in your field that you would like to learn more about? There are many resources for online learning, whether through actual coursework, e-books, online forums, YouTube videos and more. Identify a topic you can really dig into over the next few weeks, then set a daily schedule of learning for yourself.

Take care of projects around the house. Take advantage of the time that sheltering in place is providing to take care of projects or tasks around the house, such as cleaning out closets or reorganizing your garage and storage spaces. (See 15 Useful Things to Do When You’re Stuck at Home for more ideas)

Take care of yourself! It can be hard to remember to take time for yourself during a job search, especially when you don’t have the option of leaving the house. Be sure to schedule time for exercise (using videos or online exercise classes), cooking, meditating, reading or anything else that helps you feel relaxed, says careers specialist Nilza Marie Santana-Castillo (How to Navigate Your Job Search During the Coronavirus Pandemic). Step outside for a breath of fresh air, especially when you need to take a break from your computer.

The current pandemic and shelter in place orders can present challenges for job seekers, but much of today’s hiring process is done online, so there is no reason not to continue your job search. ed to take a break from your computer.

The current pandemic and shelter in place orders can present challenges for job seekers, but much of today’s hiring process is done online, so there is no reason not to continue your job search.

2020-03-20T11:30:59+00:00March 20, 2020|Job Seekers|0 Comments

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